Archives

2016

Cover Page

Journal of the Motherhood Initiative Vol 7, No 1 (2016)

Gioia Albano, “Alys and the Children,” 2013, oil and acrylic on canvas, 46cm x 55cm. <http://albanogioia.com/index_uk.html>


Artist statement: I always painted women and their endless meanings. Motherhood is for me the celebration of the creation power itself.


2015

Cover Page

Journal of the Motherhood Initiative Vol 6, No 1 (2015)

Front cover photograph:
Photo: Barbara Bickel, “Dream Scroll,” Rome, April 2015. From left to right, Angie Deveau, Andrea O’Reilly, Sara Paiola, Michelle Tarnopolsky, Nané Ariadne Jordan, Laura Zegel, and Eti Wade

Artists’ statement: The cover photo captures a spontaneous moment of women holding the Dream Scroll, releasing our collective dreams by those who participated in a Nap-In workshop. The Nap-In, a creative, active-resting practice of the Gestare Art Collective (www.gestareartcollective.com), was facilitated by Nané Jordan and Barbara Bickel at the MIRCI conference on “Maternal Subjectivities” held in Rome on April 24, 2015. Dreams are generated during the Nap-In, and then recorded in fabric onto the Dream Scroll. After the workshop we took the Dream Scroll to the Tiber River. Since 2011, Gestare Art Collective members have developed the creative practice of Nap-Ins as a community art practice in galleries, community centers, university classrooms, schools, conferences, retreat centers, libraries.


2014

Cover Page

Journal of the Motherhood Initiative Vol 5, No 2 (2014)


Cover design: Luciana Ricciutelli

Cover Page

Journal of the Motherhood Initiative Vol 5, No 1 (2014)

Front Cover Artwork:

Rachel Epp Buller, ““Women of Chortitza,” 2010. Mixed media monoprint.


2013

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Journal of the Motherhood Initiative Vol 4, No 2 (2013)

Front Cover Artwork: Afuwa

Artist Statement: As a visual artist and creative community worker, I cannot divorce the part of me that makes art from the part of me that draws upon ancestry—of blood, spirit, and land—as a source of strength and connection across migrations. Those migrations are expressed and multiplied by the body we inherit/inhabit; by drawing upon that strength and connection, the body that is the site of insult can become the location of healing, of change. I use stories of loss, love, fear, and desire to explore themes of diaspora, belonging, othering, enslavement, indentureship, and colonization, focusing on the genetic memory that resists pop-culture erasures.

Cover Page

Journal of the Motherhood Initiative Vol 4, No 1 (2013)

Front Cover Artwork:

Carly McAskill, (Detail) “If Walls Could Talk,” 2011-2013, mixed media(pastel, spray paint, wallpaper, bee’s wax) on drywall, 48 x8 feet.

Artist Statement: The multi-layered images in my drawings and collage work explore identity through meditation on place, time, presence, and inheritance. I believe in the powers of representation through collage: that is, if I visualize my fears in life, I may be able to cope with them. Anxiety is located in the dense layering that creates a sense of jostling identities, constantly being rearranged in different patterns, unable to be organized into a single stable system. The fragments are significant because they become a tool to tell a story and reflect a pattern. I use fragmentation as a visual strategy and methodology to recognize the instability of identities that are rooted in gender in order to define self within networks of memory, place, family and culture.


2012

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Journal of the Motherhood Initiative Vol 3, No 2 (2012)

Front Cover Artwork:

Aparna Agrawal, “Body Armor, Sharp Shells,” 2000, Muslin cloth, broken shells, beeswax, 19" x 12.5" x 4".

Artist Statement: I move between making sculpture, paintings, drawings and mixed media or video fluidly during the year, choosing the dimension of the work (2d or 3d or moving image) because of the ideas I want to communicate. My sculptures continue to be embedded with themes of fragility, loss, holding and transience, using common materials such as paper, wire, tissue, thread, cotton, wax, and plaster. These works often have quiet longing and sadness and speak about the body, its gesture, and its subtle narrative. Paintings and drawings are about my time spent in the natural world. Whether it’s in the Venezuelan rainforest, where I’ve been spending several weeks every year for 20 years, or the expansive pastures and woods of Vermont, and the Atlantic seacoast, I use a combination of materials to express the movement, the exhilaration I feel when I’m in sun, wind, water, and weather, and participating in nature’s rich, teeming life. More recently, my artmaking process has shifted from an isolated artistic one, based in the studio, to a collaborative one out in the world. I seek an active dialogue with others and invite them to enter a creative process. Through thinking, recollecting, and participating in work, visitors partner with me; they record their voices, make drawings, and complete a puzzle. The expression of loss and remembrance no longer a solitary passage becomes a shared one.

Cover Page

Journal of the Motherhood Initiative Vol 3, No 1 (2012)

Front Cover Artwork:

Rachel Epp Buller, “Milchkaffee,” 2011.

Artist Statement: During my graduate studies and before we had children, my partner and I fully anticipated that I would be the one to work fulltime while he would stay home to care for babies and toddlers. Life has a way of getting in the way, though, and our eventual parenting situation initially looked much more like a gendered division of labor than I would have anticipated. In the intervening years, we have sought out opportunities that allow us to alternate roles of breadwinner and caregiver. For six months of this year, we lived in Berlin, Germany, where I was paid to conduct research. I can state without question that it was easily the best job I’ve ever had: exciting work, a chance to focus fully on a single project with little outside distraction, and great colleagues in a fabulous city. And, I relished the opportunity to modify our family roles, to be the income earner in a foreign economy. While the foreign language and culture, the move from a small town to a metropolis, and the adapted parental roles all required adjustment for our family, I found that food both symbolically reflected and helped to ease the difficulty of those transitions. The photographs from this series address the purchase and preparation of food in a foreign culture, an integral part of our family’s gendered, economic, and cultural transformations.


2011

Cover Page

Journal of the Motherhood Initiative Vol 2, No 2 (2011)

Front Cover Artwork:

Ingrid Dabringer, “Phillippines,” detail, 2010, paper map, 20" x 27". <www.ingriddabringer.wordpress.com>

Cover Page

Journal of the Motherhood Initiative Vol 2, No 1 (2011)

Front Cover Artwork:

P.J. Morley, "Image: Mother Earth."


2010

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Journal of the Motherhood Initiative Vol 1, No 2 (2010)

Cover artwork: Christina Foisy

Cover design: Luciana Ricciutelli


2009

Cover Page

Journal of the Association for Research on Mothering Vol 11, No 2 (2009)

Cover art: Helen M. Stummer
Cover Design: Luciana Ricciutelli
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Journal of the Association for Research on Mothering Vol 11, No 1 (2009)

Cover art: Judith Kuegler Webster
Cover Design: Luciana Ricciutelli

2008

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Journal of the Association for Research on Mothering Vol 10, No 2 (2008)

Cover art: Janelle Hardy / Cover Design: Luciana Ricciutelli
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Journal of the Association for Research on Mothering Vol 10, No 1 (2008)

Cover Art: Dorothy Englander / Cover Design: Luciana Ricciutelli

2007

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Journal of the Association for Research on Mothering Vol 9, No 2 (2007)

Nora Patrich, "Mother and Child," acrylic on canvas, 48 x 36 inches. Visit her website at: www.norapatrich.com


2005

Cover Page

Journal of the Association for Research on Mothering Vol 7, No 2 (2005)

"Grandmother and Child," Photo: Ian Richard Barnett
Cover Page

Journal of the Association for Research on Mothering Vol 7, No 1 (2005)

"The Eternal Mother and Child," photograph by Joe Paczuski. "Mother and Child" is the creation of Florence Wyle (1881-1968), whose work is also featured at the Art Gallery of Ontario and the National Gallery in Ottawa. The sculpture is located in front of the Mothercraft building, located at 32 Heath Street West, near the Yonge/St. Clair intersection in Toronto. Mothercraft provides service coordination for families of children birth to six years with developmental delays, family assessment and support, and early intervention for mothers and children affected by substance abuse.

2004

Cover Page

Journal of the Association for Research on Mothering Vol 6, No 2 (2004)

Shirley Greer, "Ironies - Dress," detail, mixed media: softground etching, silkscreen text, embroidery, button, 81.2cm X 68.8cm, dress image size: 45cm X 53.5cm, 2002. Shirley Greer is a printmaker and textile artist who pursued a formal art education in her mid-50s, after raising her family. She graduated fom Sir Wilfred Grenfell College, Corner Brook, NL with a BFA in 2003. Her body of work titled "Ironies" was in response to the (ironic) fact that while the work of mothering is rarely valued in our society, fne art images reflecting that work are highly valued. Shirley lives, and practices her art, in Pasadena, Newfoundland.
Cover Page

Journal of the Association for Research on Mothering Vol 6, No 1 (2004)

Erin Tapley, "Offer," lithograph, 12" x 18", 1998 Erin Tapley exhibits her work in prints and mostly installations nationally. She is an Associate Profesor at University of Wisconsin Oshkosh in Art Education.

2003

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Journal of the Association for Research on Mothering Vol 5, No 2 (2003)

Suzanne Northcott, "Copper Moon," detail, mixed media on wood, 12" x 12".
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Journal of the Association for Research on Mothering Vol 5, No 1 (2003)

Brenda Clews, "Bloom," Birth Painting Series, watercolour on paper, 13.25" x 9", 1986.

2002

Cover Page

Journal of the Association for Research on Mothering Vol 4, No 2 (2002)

Kathleen Vaughan, "Heirloom 1: Margaret," (detail), mixed media on canvas, 72" x 120", 1993-1994. Photo: Kathleen Vaughan.
Cover Page

Journal of the Association for Research on Mothering Vol 4, No 1 (2002)

Stephanie Springgay, "Sindoor," hand-made paper, Sindoor powder, photograph, and acrylic paint, 40 cm X 40 cm X 24 cm, 1998. The image depicts one of the 21 vessel forms from the installation Sindoor. The forms, cast from hand-made paper are lined with vermilion red Sindoor powder, which in turn cradle a fragmented photograph of a body part. The work examines the body in relation to history, cultural production, nature, and identity as a fragment. Fractured painted body parts speak of new composites in an exploration of both the ephemerality of the body and our desire to leave a mark: to create, organize, and understand. The works position the body between artifact and archive, as a region of uncertainty.

2001

Cover Page

Journal of the Association for Research on Mothering Vol 3, No 2 (2001)

"Prayer," by Gailene Powell, oil on canvas, 78 cm. X 61 cm. This painting forms part of a series titled "Songs Before the Dawn." The series explores the bird as symbol for hope, peace and transcendence. The body of work is an ongoing collaboration between painter Gailene Powell and poet Rishma Dunlop.
Cover Page

Journal of the Association for Research on Mothering Vol 3, No 1 (2001)

Karen Turnbull, "Rhiannon," coloured artist's ink, chalk, and gesso on paper, 15" X 20.5", 2000.

2000

Cover Page

Journal of the Association for Research on Mothering Vol 2, No 2 (2000)

Winsom, 'Yemaya," (detail, tryptich), oils on canvas, 122 X 459 cm., 1999. "Yemaya is the first mother and with her the human race multiplies. She is mother of the world. She is the blood of the earth, the giver of life to all who live on this planet. Yemaya rules the house, nurtures the child in the waters of the womb, and has jurisdiction over the affairs of women. Nothing in this world can exist without Yemaya. Power is the name ofYemaya."
Cover Page

Journal of the Association for Research on Mothering Vol 2, No 1 (2000)

Judy Martin, "Self-Portrait," Detail. Painted cotton, recycled maternity clothing, hand-pieced and quilted, 46" X 50", 1986.

1999

Cover Page

Journal of the Association for Research on Mothering Vol 1, No 2 (1999)

Rosamund Elwin and her daughter, Aziza Elwin Carrington. Photo: Rachel Epstein